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Męski Chór Kameralny im. Bogdana Onisimowicza Męski Chór Kameralny im. Bogdana Onisimowicza
Męski Chór Kameralny im. Bogdana Onisimowicza Męski Chór Kameralny im. Bogdana Onisimowicza
Męski Chór Kameralny im. Bogdana Onisimowicza Męski Chór Kameralny im. Bogdana Onisimowicza
Męski Chór Kameralny im. Bogdana Onisimowicza

Old liturgical music

Liturgical singing is an inseparable element of an Orthodox services. The form of the liturgical singing ought to be aesthetic to rise to the rich hymnography, extremely beautiful and filled with a strong symbolism. The main idea of this singing is possibly the most clear and understandable introduction to the Lord’s word and mental concentration on the prayer. The liturgical singing cannot be interpreted according to the category of  secular aesthetics. Hymns and chants represent the resonance of  heavenly angel’s singing, imitating it using earthly means.

The traditional form of Orthodox Church liturgical singing  is first of all monody. Each of the local churches has shaped its own forms of liturgical singing that are the synthesis of  noted, repeated and ideal pattern of Byzantine music and local customs. Therefore, we can notice the similarity between Byzantine,  Gregorian, Armenian and closer to our Slavonic aesthetics – old Russian ( znamenny ) melodies. All those melodies were developing with the respect to the canon. The task of the singers and composers was to follow the tradition  and keep to the aged canon omitting the individual interpretation.

Through the participation in the Liturgy ( in God ), the singing became a spiritual branch. Participation in the prayer is what differs liturgical singing from music in general. The music itself has no connection to the divine source.

Old melodies seem to be rough. However, this feeling is relative and a consequence of  looking at them through the prism of contemporary polyphony where sentimentality indentifies with humility and prayerful mood ( Rus. molitwennoje pienije ).  Those feeling are relatively far from the Orthodox tradition, where spiritual weeping should never turn into weepy honesty. We used to imitate by our voices the sound of  musical instruments forgetting that Orthodox church does not allow to use and imitate them during the services.

All old kinds of singing origin from one source – Hellenistic, early – Christian music and its continuation – Byzantine music. The proof of this thesis is modality ( the usage of 8 modes system ) represented in all those kinds.

This conception builds the natural protection against undesirable influences and establishes a guarantee of continuity of Orthodox liturgical singing tradition.

 

 

 

Bibliography:

Prp. Siluan Afonskij, Podworie Russkogo na Afonie Swiato-Panteleimonowa Monastyria w Moskwie, 1998.

s. Elżbieta Zołotariew, Śpiew Cerkiewny a Muzyka.

B.Kutuzow, Zmaniennyj raspiew-pojuszczeje bogosłowije, Moskwa 2001.

 

 

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Męski Chór Kameralny im. Bogdana Onisimowicza

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